3 weeks ago
24V Power Distribution Update
Reason for Installation
Part 2 of the 24VDC Power saga - new power supply design
Used Products
×1
×1
Location
Denver, CO, USA
Description

This is an update to my previous story on the PDU for remote control of 24VDC power at our sites  https://community.ubnt.com/t5/EdgeMAX-Stories/24V-Power-Distribution-Unit/cns-p/2223858

 

We did run into an issue with the Tycon power units we have been using over the years to produce backed-up 24V power at our sites - turns out Tycon had a manufacturing glitch at the factory, plus they have downrated the units from 300 watts to 120 due to overheating problems.   We had one new unit fail completely after just 3 days at a site, and others have had issues as well.   So I went looking for an alternative for future sites

AltronixPS3.jpg

 

 

 

 

What I found was another unit from Altronix, a 24V 10 amp power supply with integrated battery charging/backup built in - the EFlow 104NBeflow104nb.jpg

 

 

It is another device built for the Fire Alarm industry, so it's built really well.   Plus it has a number of alarms and control relay inputs and outputs so it can do more than just supply DC power.   It is also designed to connect with the LINQ2 remote control unit so you can monitor and control up to 2 of the power supplies via ethernet.   

 

I got a pair and a LINQ2 and this is what I came up withAltronixPS.jpg

 

 

Fits nicely in a 1RU chassis (the same ones I use for my shelf system) and was easy to connect up and make work.   THe LINQ2 remote unit doesn't have a lot of functionality, but you can remotely switch the PSs on and off and power cycle them, plus it monitors the voltage and current and the outboard relays and inputs - things like alarms on AC off, etc.   Put two of them in a pair of 1RU chassis with cooling fans and here's what they look likeAltronixPS2.jpg

 

 

 

THe second unit is face up;  the first one is upright behind it.   

 

Adding a PDU in it's own chassis and some shelf units, and this is what the finished unit looks likeFStowerPSrack.jpg

 

 

Now one thing we've learned from the Tycon problems is to really burn in the units - infant mortality of components is a fact of life.   But it's hard to do that without some specialized test equipment.   So I built a load center for testing 24 and 54 volt (like EdgePower) unitsLoadTest.jpg

 

 

Using a combination of 6 and 8 ohm 50 watt resistors and cooling fans, the screw strip on the right on the photo lets me adjust the connections of the resistors to build any load up to 6A at 24V and 3A at 54V.   THe meters monitor the power out to the load and the battery input or charging current.   The one above is testing a Tycon at 5A - we're now burning in the ones we still have for 10 hours or more to make sure we don't see any more failures.   We will do this with all the units (Tycon, Altronix, EdgePower, etc.) we use from now on.   Better safe than sorry...

Jim

 

24V Power Distribution Update

by 3 weeks ago - last edited 3 weeks ago

This is an update to my previous story on the PDU for remote control of 24VDC power at our sites  https://community.ubnt.com/t5/EdgeMAX-Stories/24V-Power-Distribution-Unit/cns-p/2223858

 

We did run into an issue with the Tycon power units we have been using over the years to produce backed-up 24V power at our sites - turns out Tycon had a manufacturing glitch at the factory, plus they have downrated the units from 300 watts to 120 due to overheating problems.   We had one new unit fail completely after just 3 days at a site, and others have had issues as well.   So I went looking for an alternative for future sites

AltronixPS3.jpg

 

 

 

 

What I found was another unit from Altronix, a 24V 10 amp power supply with integrated battery charging/backup built in - the EFlow 104NBeflow104nb.jpg

 

 

It is another device built for the Fire Alarm industry, so it's built really well.   Plus it has a number of alarms and control relay inputs and outputs so it can do more than just supply DC power.   It is also designed to connect with the LINQ2 remote control unit so you can monitor and control up to 2 of the power supplies via ethernet.   

 

I got a pair and a LINQ2 and this is what I came up withAltronixPS.jpg

 

 

Fits nicely in a 1RU chassis (the same ones I use for my shelf system) and was easy to connect up and make work.   THe LINQ2 remote unit doesn't have a lot of functionality, but you can remotely switch the PSs on and off and power cycle them, plus it monitors the voltage and current and the outboard relays and inputs - things like alarms on AC off, etc.   Put two of them in a pair of 1RU chassis with cooling fans and here's what they look likeAltronixPS2.jpg

 

 

 

THe second unit is face up;  the first one is upright behind it.   

 

Adding a PDU in it's own chassis and some shelf units, and this is what the finished unit looks likeFStowerPSrack.jpg

 

 

Now one thing we've learned from the Tycon problems is to really burn in the units - infant mortality of components is a fact of life.   But it's hard to do that without some specialized test equipment.   So I built a load center for testing 24 and 54 volt (like EdgePower) unitsLoadTest.jpg

 

 

Using a combination of 6 and 8 ohm 50 watt resistors and cooling fans, the screw strip on the right on the photo lets me adjust the connections of the resistors to build any load up to 6A at 24V and 3A at 54V.   THe meters monitor the power out to the load and the battery input or charging current.   The one above is testing a Tycon at 5A - we're now burning in the ones we still have for 10 hours or more to make sure we don't see any more failures.   We will do this with all the units (Tycon, Altronix, EdgePower, etc.) we use from now on.   Better safe than sorry...

Jim

 

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Comments
by
3 weeks ago

Nice to see all the electronic stuffm it reminds me of my younger years. 

But 19" case with a fan in the top/bottom won't work as intended , when units are stacked on top of each other.

 

by
3 weeks ago

16again

Nice to see all the electronic stuffm it reminds me of my younger years.
But 19" case with a fan in the top/bottom won't work as intended , when units are stacked on top of each other.

 

Actually it works exactly the way I designed it - all the fans in the stack blow up/down so as to cool the routers that go in the shelves; for the power units they blow into each other and out through the large openings in the rear for all the cables.   THey don't stack the way you are thinking - there are always spaces in the sections above or below the fans for full air circulation.   These have been working at many of our sites since mid-2015 without any issues   

https://community.ubnt.com/t5/EdgeMAX-Stories/Mounting-system-for-redundant-ERs-Pt2/cns-p/1318048

https://community.ubnt.com/t5/EdgeMAX-Stories/Mounting-System-for-Redundant-ERs-Pt-3/cns-p/1408553

and cool everything very nicely.   I recently (last summer ) added thermostatic switches to the design to only run the fans when the temperature exceeds 85F to reduce power consumption and  extend their life.

Jim