New Member
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Registered: ‎02-08-2016
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Furthering my education

Just curious for recommendations.  I have been repairing computers and running small networks for 20 years.  I have been installing UniFi for about 3 - 4 years.  I have always figured out stuff on my own for the most part.  I am A+ Certified (in like 2000).  I understand networks for the most part but the forensic analysis (Wireshark) and some of the advanced settings, etc. I would like to understand better.  I want to further my education, but I'm not sure where to look.  I have just looked ay Lynda (LinkedIn Learning), but I don't have a lot of time to waste as I stay fairly busy (this is my slow time of year).  If anyone has recommendations I would love to hear them.  Thanks.

Regular Member
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Re: Furthering my education

Hmm... Not enough time for an online course. Can you tell us roughly how much time you do have to invest?

-- Pete
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Re: Furthering my education

I can make time (after work, slow days, etc) if it's a worthwile course.  I just don't wat to invest a bunch of time (or money) in courses that are not right for me.  I am intermediate I would think, and I have a strong grasp of basic networking.  I have setup Networks (going back to ISDN and dial up), VLANS and corporate networks, and Large home and business UniFi and DD-WRT Mesh networks.  I am looking for anything to help me diagnose problems with networks (IP cameras connecting at slow speeds and disabling slower speeds to help, I learned recently) I have always learned as I needed, but I do enough networking I feel like I should have a better grasp on the advanced settings for my customers.  Especially with wireless but VLANs and intercompatibility with other brands, etc. wouldn't hut either.  Any advise is appreciated.

Regular Member
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Registered: ‎08-19-2016
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Re: Furthering my education

[ Edited ]

I'd start by learning the details of how the internet protocols work, then build up from their until you meet your existing higher-level, knowledge of connecting and configuring network equipment.

 

I prefer to learn by reading, so I'd look at books.  My favorite for the details of the protocols is the "TCP/IP Illustrated" series by W. Richard Stevens, especially volume 1 and volume 3. They were written a LONG time ago, however, and some details have changed. (I see that Volume 1 was updated in 2011, so it's probably reasonably contemporary.)  One approach would be to see what textbooks are currently used in college courses on networking.  Also, other forum members may be aware of better/newer books.

 

-- Pete

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Re: Furthering my education

Part of what makes this difficult is that so much of Networking is interrelated to computers and electronics in general that you end up needing a rather broad background in a lot of things to make sense of it all.   I spent 5 years teaching high-level programming  languages (C, C++, OOA&D, Java, Perl, Network Architectures, etc.) to F-500 company programmers across the US so I have some experience with this.   If all you are learning about is the specific protocols, but don't understand the underlying hardware and software behind it, you will be at a deficit.   Doesn't mean you need to be an Electrical Engineer first, but understanding how a CPU works gives a lot of insight into what's going on in the Networking Stack.   Understanding how C structures work, or how memory allocation happens in a computer makes understanding how data is transfered easier.   The Protocols are obviously imnportant, but a good grounding in how the whole thing works can be invaluable.

 

As to the textbooks, I think the Comer "Internetworking with TCP-IP" series is excellent too for the protocols, and his "Computer Networks and Internets" is also very good.  Also, the best book I ever read for a greater understanding of how OSs work would be Stevens' "Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment" (now in it's 3rd edition) - we used to use it as the primary text in our Advanced C classes.   But the Stevens is written using C code examples, so if you don't know the C language it may not do you a lot of good.

 

Wish I could say there was an easy way to do this, but there really isn't...

Jim 

" How can anyone trust Scientists? If new evidence comes along, they change their minds! " Politician's joke (sort of...)
"Humans are allergic to change..They love to say, ‘We’ve always done it this way.’ I try to fight that. "Admiral Grace Hopper, USN, Computer Scientist
"It's not Rocket Science! - Oh wait, Actually it is... "NASA bumper sticker
"Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should."my mantra in the Programming classes I used to teach once upon a time...