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What category cable to use.

Such a rookie question did not know what forum it belonged in.

What category cable do I use?

The last time I used cable they were up to Cat4!

Now Cat 5, 6, & 7??

I'm connecting from  POE ports to 25' to the outside of the building to

Lite AP GPS

AC Mesh PRO

 

And then short runs from NannoStation 5AC cabled to AC Mesh PRO and run a cable down into another metal building.


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SuperUser
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Registered: ‎06-23-2009
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Re: What category cable to use.

Frankly, for such short runs, it may not matter much.

But use a minimum of CAT5e cable  made with 100%

copper wires--not the copper-coated aluminum [CCA]

junk that's often sold in hardware stores.

 

If outoors, use shielded outdoor-rated cable--Ubiquiti

Tough Cable Pro is a good choice.  Dave


> HQ in Seacoast region New Hampshire U.S.A.
> Ubiquiti Certified Trainer [UCT] for:
     UBWA [AirMax] / UEWA [UniFi] / UBRSS [routers]
UBNT.NH@gmail.com

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Established Member
Posts: 1,993
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Re: What category cable to use.

Lightning rod at least two feet higher than equipment.
Shielded CAT5e cable and surge protector. Though the surge protector isn't going to mitigate a direct strike.
Or forego the surge protector and open up cable at bottom of drip loop and use bronze grounding clamp, then loosely tape it up and it wil allow water collected to drain out. Standard pratice now on that national WISP that I won't name.
My name is Jesus. I'm Mexican. You pronounce it HAY-soos not GEE-sus.

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SuperUser
Posts: 42,779
Registered: ‎06-23-2009
Kudos: 8742
Solutions: 1489

Re: What category cable to use.

Frankly, for such short runs, it may not matter much.

But use a minimum of CAT5e cable  made with 100%

copper wires--not the copper-coated aluminum [CCA]

junk that's often sold in hardware stores.

 

If outoors, use shielded outdoor-rated cable--Ubiquiti

Tough Cable Pro is a good choice.  Dave


> HQ in Seacoast region New Hampshire U.S.A.
> Ubiquiti Certified Trainer [UCT] for:
     UBWA [AirMax] / UEWA [UniFi] / UBRSS [routers]
UBNT.NH@gmail.com
New Member
Posts: 31
Registered: 3 weeks ago
Solutions: 2

Re: What category cable to use.

[ Edited ]

You are making this so easy for us not to screw up. Thank you.

U-ROCK!

 

Another basic question with no forum I see to post it in.

 

What about lightning protection? In San Diego, we do not get weather. Let alone lightning.

Dave, in your experience, is it a significant problem 'aiming' for our outside equipment? 

What do you use and recommend to protect bridges and outside mesh ap's.

 

Lightning rods at a higher point than the equipment?

And would you use RJ45 surge suppressors and where = even on the short connection between  NannoStation and AC MESH PRO'S?

Established Member
Posts: 1,993
Registered: ‎09-18-2014
Kudos: 711
Solutions: 51

Re: What category cable to use.

Lightning rod at least two feet higher than equipment.
Shielded CAT5e cable and surge protector. Though the surge protector isn't going to mitigate a direct strike.
Or forego the surge protector and open up cable at bottom of drip loop and use bronze grounding clamp, then loosely tape it up and it wil allow water collected to drain out. Standard pratice now on that national WISP that I won't name.
My name is Jesus. I'm Mexican. You pronounce it HAY-soos not GEE-sus.
New Member
Posts: 31
Registered: 3 weeks ago
Solutions: 2

Re: What category cable to use.

Thank you!

Established Member
Posts: 1,993
Registered: ‎09-18-2014
Kudos: 711
Solutions: 51

Re: What category cable to use.


@Magbis wrote:
Or forego the surge protector and open up cable at bottom of drip loop and use bronze grounding clamp, then loosely tape it up and it wil allow water collected to drain out.

And that meets the NEC antenna grounding recommendations.

My name is Jesus. I'm Mexican. You pronounce it HAY-soos not GEE-sus.