07/20/2018
Residential Installation In a Hot Wiring Closet!
Used Products
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Location
201 W Jefferson St, Tupelo, MS 38804, USA
Description

 

My UniFi experience began a few years ago when I needed to improve the WiFi in our house.  POE was going to be key to proper placement of a new AP, and a single UAP-LR near the top of our central 2-story foyer covered the entire house, patio and attached garage with robust 2.4 GHz service.

I was immediately impressed with the UniFi management platform, and have since adopted the product line as the preferred network solution for most of my commercial IT clients.  I've also put a few more of the products into our home.

The house is 2600 SQF, built in Y2K, and has a structured cabling system.  This provides a minimum of (2) Cat5 and (2) RG6 home runs to each of 2-3 jack locations per room (plus bonded grounding, speaker wire, etc.).  Additional cable has been pulled for UniFi Video cameras.  UniFi 150W switches have been installed to deliver power and connectivity to the cameras and other POE devices.  I also have a UniFi 60W switch in my lab for provisioning VoIP phones, RPi's, and other POE equipment for customer projects.

 

1 - Wiring Closet.jpgThe Wiring Closet

 

My home office requires constant connectivity, but it's not unusual for the cable Internet service to go down.  I have a USG providing WAN fail-over to 4G cellular.

 

13 - USG & Peplink Failover Router.jpgUSG with WAN Failover Solution. The primary DOCSIS modem is in another room for close visual monitoring! Man Happy

 

I recently installed UniFi Mesh to extend the network further outdoors for a "creek-cam", while also expanding WiFi coverage to the driveway and entire backyard.  I've replaced the original UAP-LR with an AC-Pro since many of our client devices do 5 GHz now.  I also wanted the Pro so I could test longer-range mesh extension through walls for fail-over (it works, though throughput suffers a  bit).

 

2 - Topology.pngTopology Map

 

11 - 2G Coverage Map.pngWiFi Coverage Map (sort of; structural properties have not been defined)

 

3 - Foyer Main UAP-AC-PRO.jpgUAP-AC-Pro in Central Foyer

 

8 - Patio UVC-G3 LED & UAP-AC-M.jpgMesh Base Station (and hardwired UVC-G3 with LED)

 

9 - Shed UAP-AC-M & UVC-G3-AF.jpgMesh Connected Creek Cam

 

10- Shed POE Arrangement.jpgPOE Arrangement in Shed

 

12 - View from Creek Cam - 6000 Kbps on Shed UAP-AC-M.pngView from Creek Cam (Snapped from 10 FPS, 6000 Kbps feed)

 

The wiring closet is on the second floor and open to the attic.  The ambient temperature can reach over 90°F.  I've had an old D-Link consumer-grade switch survive the past 10 years.  UBNT's specs indicate that their industrial designs are also up for the torture.

 

We're in the midst of a Mississippi heat wave, and the hottest internal temp I've seen reported on the US-8-150W's is 78 °C (173 °F).  Measured surface temps were 128 °F, and 130 °F on the SFP's.  That's hot to the touch, but I'm giving the intentionally fanless design of these switches a chance.  They're within their stated environmental operating range (max 104 °F per the Datasheet; 113 °F per the Quick Start Guide).  In their favor, they're currently only supplying a total of about 12W POE power each.

 

 

Thermometer.pngOnly 86°F and 59% RH under cloud cover!

 

Switch Temp.pngInternal Temp of Top Switch

 

IMG_20180720_174502255.jpgFinal Switch Orientation

I was able to bring the temp of the top switch down a bit by re-orienting both switches so that the ports are facing up instead of to the side.  The sideways arrangement, while permissible according to the product web page, allowed convective heat to travel directly up through the ventilation holes, making the switch on top much hotter when placed one above the other.  However, this also allowed the bottom switch to run cooler.  In their current orientation, they stay within 2-3 °C of each other.

 

 

 

Other Stuff:

 

Hosting of the UniFi Controller and NVR is currently on an old Windows 7 "server" with just 4 GB of RAM, along with an automation controller for lighting, and a music/photo media server.  The server is definitely at max capacity now, but gets the job done.  This includes high bitrate recordings for UVC, although re-allocating 1 GB of memory for a RAM-Disk was required to pull that off (and I've learned is always UBNT's recommendation).

 

I look forward to testing the forthcoming "CloudKey Gen2 Plus" as a partial replacement for this legacy server!

UniFi Network accessories not in the product list above include:
- TC-Pro TOUGHCable (exposed outdoor runs)
- ETH-SP-G2 (surge suppressor for the base-station Mesh AP)

UniFi Video products include:
 (3) UVC‑G3
 (3) UVC‑G3‑AF
 (1) UVC‑G3‑DOME
 (1) UVC-G3-FLEX
 (1) UVC-G3-LED (IR range extender)

Non-UBNT products in the network include:
- Motorola/Arris SB6141 (DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem)
- Peplink MAX-BR1-Mini (LTE WAN failover modem/router- I sure wish UBNT had a cellular solution!)
- Macroreer 1000Base-T SFP's (WAN uplink/server downlink)
- D-Link DGS-2208 (old non-managed gigabit switch)
- A couple more non-managed 100 Mbps switches in our A/V media centers
- Comtrend PowerGrid-9141s (cheap Powerline Ethernet adapters)

 

Yes, the powerline adapters come in handy for temporary uses even with all this structured cabling, but I'd rather be testing the UBNT EtherMagic kit!

 

The structured wiring can is by FutureSmart Networks, now part of Honeywell Security.

 

There are also a couple of UPS systems involved here to supply steady power.

 

 

 

Residential Installation In a Hot Wiring Closet!

by ‎07-20-2018 05:56 PM - edited ‎07-20-2018 10:59 PM

 

My UniFi experience began a few years ago when I needed to improve the WiFi in our house.  POE was going to be key to proper placement of a new AP, and a single UAP-LR near the top of our central 2-story foyer covered the entire house, patio and attached garage with robust 2.4 GHz service.

I was immediately impressed with the UniFi management platform, and have since adopted the product line as the preferred network solution for most of my commercial IT clients.  I've also put a few more of the products into our home.

The house is 2600 SQF, built in Y2K, and has a structured cabling system.  This provides a minimum of (2) Cat5 and (2) RG6 home runs to each of 2-3 jack locations per room (plus bonded grounding, speaker wire, etc.).  Additional cable has been pulled for UniFi Video cameras.  UniFi 150W switches have been installed to deliver power and connectivity to the cameras and other POE devices.  I also have a UniFi 60W switch in my lab for provisioning VoIP phones, RPi's, and other POE equipment for customer projects.

 

1 - Wiring Closet.jpgThe Wiring Closet

 

My home office requires constant connectivity, but it's not unusual for the cable Internet service to go down.  I have a USG providing WAN fail-over to 4G cellular.

 

13 - USG & Peplink Failover Router.jpgUSG with WAN Failover Solution. The primary DOCSIS modem is in another room for close visual monitoring! Man Happy

 

I recently installed UniFi Mesh to extend the network further outdoors for a "creek-cam", while also expanding WiFi coverage to the driveway and entire backyard.  I've replaced the original UAP-LR with an AC-Pro since many of our client devices do 5 GHz now.  I also wanted the Pro so I could test longer-range mesh extension through walls for fail-over (it works, though throughput suffers a  bit).

 

2 - Topology.pngTopology Map

 

11 - 2G Coverage Map.pngWiFi Coverage Map (sort of; structural properties have not been defined)

 

3 - Foyer Main UAP-AC-PRO.jpgUAP-AC-Pro in Central Foyer

 

8 - Patio UVC-G3 LED & UAP-AC-M.jpgMesh Base Station (and hardwired UVC-G3 with LED)

 

9 - Shed UAP-AC-M & UVC-G3-AF.jpgMesh Connected Creek Cam

 

10- Shed POE Arrangement.jpgPOE Arrangement in Shed

 

12 - View from Creek Cam - 6000 Kbps on Shed UAP-AC-M.pngView from Creek Cam (Snapped from 10 FPS, 6000 Kbps feed)

 

The wiring closet is on the second floor and open to the attic.  The ambient temperature can reach over 90°F.  I've had an old D-Link consumer-grade switch survive the past 10 years.  UBNT's specs indicate that their industrial designs are also up for the torture.

 

We're in the midst of a Mississippi heat wave, and the hottest internal temp I've seen reported on the US-8-150W's is 78 °C (173 °F).  Measured surface temps were 128 °F, and 130 °F on the SFP's.  That's hot to the touch, but I'm giving the intentionally fanless design of these switches a chance.  They're within their stated environmental operating range (max 104 °F per the Datasheet; 113 °F per the Quick Start Guide).  In their favor, they're currently only supplying a total of about 12W POE power each.

 

 

Thermometer.pngOnly 86°F and 59% RH under cloud cover!

 

Switch Temp.pngInternal Temp of Top Switch

 

IMG_20180720_174502255.jpgFinal Switch Orientation

I was able to bring the temp of the top switch down a bit by re-orienting both switches so that the ports are facing up instead of to the side.  The sideways arrangement, while permissible according to the product web page, allowed convective heat to travel directly up through the ventilation holes, making the switch on top much hotter when placed one above the other.  However, this also allowed the bottom switch to run cooler.  In their current orientation, they stay within 2-3 °C of each other.

 

 

 

Other Stuff:

 

Hosting of the UniFi Controller and NVR is currently on an old Windows 7 "server" with just 4 GB of RAM, along with an automation controller for lighting, and a music/photo media server.  The server is definitely at max capacity now, but gets the job done.  This includes high bitrate recordings for UVC, although re-allocating 1 GB of memory for a RAM-Disk was required to pull that off (and I've learned is always UBNT's recommendation).

 

I look forward to testing the forthcoming "CloudKey Gen2 Plus" as a partial replacement for this legacy server!

UniFi Network accessories not in the product list above include:
- TC-Pro TOUGHCable (exposed outdoor runs)
- ETH-SP-G2 (surge suppressor for the base-station Mesh AP)

UniFi Video products include:
 (3) UVC‑G3
 (3) UVC‑G3‑AF
 (1) UVC‑G3‑DOME
 (1) UVC-G3-FLEX
 (1) UVC-G3-LED (IR range extender)

Non-UBNT products in the network include:
- Motorola/Arris SB6141 (DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem)
- Peplink MAX-BR1-Mini (LTE WAN failover modem/router- I sure wish UBNT had a cellular solution!)
- Macroreer 1000Base-T SFP's (WAN uplink/server downlink)
- D-Link DGS-2208 (old non-managed gigabit switch)
- A couple more non-managed 100 Mbps switches in our A/V media centers
- Comtrend PowerGrid-9141s (cheap Powerline Ethernet adapters)

 

Yes, the powerline adapters come in handy for temporary uses even with all this structured cabling, but I'd rather be testing the UBNT EtherMagic kit!

 

The structured wiring can is by FutureSmart Networks, now part of Honeywell Security.

 

There are also a couple of UPS systems involved here to supply steady power.

 

 

 

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Comments
by
on ‎07-20-2018 06:03 PM

Awesome setup! Clean as well!

by
on ‎07-20-2018 08:01 PM

Would you posting the steps to use wan2 for fail over. I have a Netgear LTE modem for failover but it is currently setup between my cable modem and usg3 and automatically handles failover on it's own.

 

Does the usg3 automatically failover? And then go back to lan1 when it's back?

 

Can it alert you when it fails over to wan2?

by
on ‎07-20-2018 11:33 PM

@firesq38, Depends on controller version.  For older ones, see this thread:

https://community.ubnt.com/t5/UniFi-Routing-Switching/usg-not-pro-wan2-lan-2-configuration/m-p/23831...

 

I think some settings were also found under Devices, and the USG Config settings at one point.

 

I'm running 5.8.24 and it's now under Settings, Network, WAN2/LAN2.  There you can set the Load Balancing to "Failover Only".  Back under Devices, Config, Echo Server you can override the default target for the latency monitor, which determines outages, but I haven't had to do that.

 

Yes, in this latest version my experience is that it automatically fails over AND BACK back just fine, and can alert in both cases.  See Settings, Notifications, Gateway Events, "Gateway event".

by
on ‎07-21-2018 02:16 AM

Awesome 

by
on ‎07-21-2018 05:38 AM

@GreggC Thank you. I'll have to give this a try since my failover LTE modem is data only, it can't send text alerts like it should.

by
on ‎07-21-2018 10:02 AM

Awesome setup! 

by
on ‎08-03-2018 07:55 AM

This looks great.  I have been very concerned about the documented low heat threshold that I've been doing my own testing as well.  

by
on ‎08-03-2018 08:52 AM

 

@CST-KenLambert, I think it is going to be fine.  Everything is operating within the specified environmental requirements.  Time (as in years) will tell for sure.

 

I'm actually very happy to have this environnment as a proving ground.  I always advise against such conditions for critical infrastructure in business environments, but sometimes the customers don't allow much choice.

 

I am probably going to install an AcuRite or similar low-cost connected temp/humidity sensor in that closet to log and graph the conditions over time. 

 

 

by
on ‎08-17-2018 12:58 PM

Where did you get the Honeywell cabinet?  I didn't think they made them anymore!

by
‎08-17-2018 04:47 PM - edited ‎08-17-2018 04:48 PM

@smyers119  For some reason I only see them on Honeywell's Canadian web site now:

https://www.security.honeywell.com/canada/products/intruder-detection-systems/wiring/qu/

 

I've also seen some of the components, and similar offerings from other brands, on Amazon and other reseller web sites:

https://www.amazon.com/Honeywell-QNIC24-QuickNetwork-Install-Panel/dp/B007TNQLYK

 

I bought mine direct from the manufacturer when building the house, a few years before Honeywell purchased the company.