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Established Member
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Re: Best setting for warehouse

Can you post a screenshot of this page?

Settings > Maintenance > Show System Config

 

If you left them "out of the box" you probably have all sorts of overlap and such. These have to be tuned, using them out of the box MIGHT work for a single AP in a house in the middle of a ranch, but not so much anywhere else.

Emerging Member
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Re: Best setting for warehouse

I am having a warehouse project as well. I heard that the UniFi is not that proper with devices such as zebra devices or any other barcode scanners. The issue lies within the roaming. It will disconnect when they walk. They distrubitor recommend me Ruckus. They have seamless roaming. Lets see how you will fix the issue, if it’s possible to fix. I hope so. Then I will go for the UniFi, as I love the software and devices. 

 

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Re: Best setting for warehouse

1. If am correct 5Ghz has a shorter range.
2. Based on the antenna design these should produce a "cone", instead of a "donut", thus penetrating downward.
3. I believe they are 40-50 feet above the floor.
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Re: Best setting for warehouse


@nilesf wrote:
1. If am correct 5Ghz has a shorter range.

Actually, that's a very common misconception. Signals in both frequency bands (2.4 and 5 GHz) propagate exactly the same, governed by the inverse square law. What makes a difference are the sources of attenuation that happen to be in their path. Some materials cause more attenuation to 5 GHz and others to 2.4 GHz since it is a function of wavelehgth. 

 


@nilesf wrote:
2. Based on the antenna design these should produce a "cone", instead of a "donut", thus penetrating downward.

That's not correct. If you take a close look at the AC-M-PRO's antenna radiation pattern you'll notice that it doesn't resemble a cone at all. It is pretty much a typical omni(ish) radiation pattern found in outdoor APs with captive antennas. In your case less than 1/3 of the radiated energy is directed to your client devices.

 


@nilesf wrote:
3. I believe they are 40-50 feet above the floor.

That's way too high for any AP with non-directional antennas.

 

 

If you wanted to go with UniFi you should have chosen the AC-M APs and pair them with addecuate directional antennas (e.g. UMA-D). That's about the only feasible option for your scenario. Mounting "hundreds" of AC-M-PROs 40+ feet above the floor all transmitting at max power is a recipe for disaster. The problem is further compounded by using 2.4 GHz, which means you only have 3 channels available. If for example you had 210 APs in that facility it would mean that there will be 70 APs in each channel. So potentially those 70 APs and all their associated client devices will be contending for a chance to access the medium. It you look at channel utilization over time you should notice sustained values at or above 60%.

 

I'd recommend you go with a 5 GHz only configuration using 20 MHz-wide channels and transmit power set to medium. While it could improve things, I don't think any amount of configuration tweaking will be able to provide for a problem-free deployment with good roaming behavior. I'm afraid that would require a complete rip and replace, based on a design made by a qualified WLAN consultant.

 

Omar    
 

 Omar Vazquez - Consultant | Trainer
Dot11 Pro
                     

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