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Got a good deal and now what?

[ Edited ]

Hi - after much back and forth decided to go with the Unifi AP. Called up a very reputable store in NY City and the guy on the other side offered me too good a deal to pass up! The AC-LR and and AC-PRO I must purchase together and the final price for both is $170, Too good to pass up and took it.

 

Now - I have a small townhouse 1500 sq. ft altogether, 1st. and 2nd. floor. I get spotty coverage in basement. Between floors and the walls are plaster. What I am wondering now is how to figure out where to place the APs? Forget for a moment issue with cables, etc. I'll figure that out once I finalize on location. Also - should I put LR on 2nd. floor or PRO on 2nd. floor? 

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

I am actually using a 2 x 4 and works peachy. I'll use your advice and I have a portable setup with 4K video streaming - which I'm using to test.

Personally, till now results indicate I might even return the PRO.... The LR is giving enough juice even in basement. The catch is when MULTIPLE devices stream/kids play.

 

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

Just came back from NY City!! Hoorah... I now have my much coveted (2 years running) 2 Unifi APs. I just made myself a small drink - my 21 year old Single Malt. 

 

Unfortunately, this has set me back a bit even after the good deal. The store offered me another product which has a 7 day return policy as it's sparingly used in case it doesn't work. They didn't get a chance to vet it. I needed it anyways. Its a TP-Link T1500G 10 MPS Gigabit 8-port, PoE+ switch and has 2 SFP slots. I really don't know what SMART means but store owner told me for my home use should suffice. Got it for $20 bucks. I had my eyes set on the Ubiquiti one but its almost $200 bucks. 

 

What I need now - is to figure out where to place the APs. 2nd.: how to get the controller software up and running. I have an Intel i5 PC with 16 Gb. RAM and 256 Gb. SSD which I plan to use as my router for now (has 2 NIC cards). Reading here that its possible to download and install the software and I am 20 year Java programmer. Not sure - but that home router I already have SquidGuard and pFSense installed. Not sure if its required or Unifi Controller software is good enough. SquidGuard - am pretty sure will need. 

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

Aside from good wireless coverage, what are you trying to accomplish with your network? And what are you using as your router now? What is your internet connection speed? The PC you're talking about seems like serious overkill in terms of electrical power draw (and probably physical size, too). You would be better off with a router that is purpose built such as the USG or EdgeRouter, or other options that are low power, small devices that are designed for high routing performance. The Unifi Controller software is used to configure your APs (also a USG, if you get one), but does not, in itself, do any routing.

 

I'm a bit worried about circumstances under which you have been buying the equipment -- sounds a little odd that you're getting these 'great deals' yet they're not helping you understand what you need and why.

 

Anyway, the switch you bought is a good piece of hardware and for $20 is a steal (hopefully not literally -- it is normally >$100. The 'smart' part of this switch is that it is configurable to handle VLANs, LAGs, port isolation, and other more advanced networking features. It has PoE+ (802.3at), so that's great. Make sure you have a more recent LR model -- the old ones may be damaged if plugged into this switch, the new ones are designed specifically to work with the new standards -- it will say on the box and on the back of the AP.

 

 

 

 

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

2ndFloor.jpg2nd. FloorBasement.jpgBasement1stFloor.jpg1st. Floor

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

[ Edited ]

1st. of all -> that router is temporary. Reason being - I wanted to take it up on myself to configure a good router coupled with pFSense, etc., etc. In effect, I am still learning - what on Earth is a VLAN, what's tagging, etc., etc. 

In the near future, as soon as situation permits ($ wise) I'll go for the $100 USG device replacing my home solution. I am hoping that if I buy the USG (~ $100) then it can act both as a controller and a router. However, I saw it provides options like VLAN creation however my devices will be plugged into the TP-LINK switch, will VLAN work, if attempted in the USG?

 

Thank you - for the heads-up on the switch. The store was actually helpful. They explained to me the pros and cons of going all Ubiquiti, etc., etc also. They actually helped me out here by offering me the switch. Its a big-box and well known store on 42nd. street NY City, I think many will understand which one. They are solid.I happen to know a guy there so it helps.[I work 4 blocks away]

Your questions 

- my ISP bumped me to 300 mbps recently (zero cost to me). I need to switch my modem but they have given me Arris SB6190 modem - its a 32 channel 1.5 Gbps speed modem.

 

I just uploaded some signal strength values using a old 300 mbps N router - Netgear WNR2000v3. 

 

You're correct - aside from better coverage, I also suffer from: buffering when playing movies in my TV - its a 4K 65-inch smart TV on 1st. floor and a 55-inch 4k TV - basement. If my kids friends come over and they play using laptops some games - my network stops (they play in basement, around 3 kids max). If 3 kids play, again in basement - XBox One (with 4K support) some game like Halo 5 then network stops. What I do also is work 3 days / week remotely where using my company VPN connect remotely. 

 

 

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

It is awesome that you want to learn all about advanced networking and that you're making some smart investments to make this possible. OTOH, if you find that you're diving into unfamiliar waters and you're looking for something simple and reliable, consider some of the consumer grade mesh networking products that are on the market -- there are some great ones that are really simple to use.

 

If you're still excited about this new world of possiblities, read on.

 

The physical locations of your APs will depend on a number of factors and I'm not really an expert on this topic. There are some ways of simulating the wireless performance with some tools from Ubiquiti -- I'm sure others can chime in with advice on how to use the simulator and also how to locate your optimal AP locations. That said, my initial thoughts are to mount the LR to the ceiling of the 3rd floor, hopefully in as central a location as possible. And then mount the PRO in the basement, also on the ceiling, hopefully in the middle of the space. This assumes that you have, or will be able to run cables to these locations, ideally everything terminating a central spot where you'll have your modem and router and such. You may want to try turning down the power on the PRO a little bit so that clients on the upper and middle floors use the LR and the basement devices are all on the PRO.

 

The TP-Link swtich can handle VLANs and a whole bunch of other things. It is good hardware and the built in PoE will be a nice added touch.

 

 

However, I'd like to propose another solution...

How many *wired* devices will you be using? If the answer is less than 2 wired devices + the 2 APs (total of 4 devices + the cable modem for 5 total ports), I think you'd be better off with the EdgeRouter X -- it is a surprisingly powerful wired router with a 5 port switch (most people will configure 1 WAN + 4 LAN ports). Super flexible, VLAN aware, and fairly inexpensive. For just $50, you could get a fantastic router that would be a good learning platform, too. And if you return that TP-Link switch, the delta is only $30 (I am assuming that the APs came with the PoE adapters in the box so that you don't absolutely need a PoE switch... if they were not included, it is possible you're not getting quite the deal you expected in the first place).

 

The advantage of the ER-X is that it is inexpensive, performant, and simple to do the initial setup. You will have a working setup fairly quickly and you can build from there as your needs (or curiosity) increase. If you go with a pf-sense box or similar, you'll spend a lot more time and energy just getting it running in the first place (unless this is what you want).

 

FWIW, I am not trying to dissuade you from using other brands/platforms or techniques... just voicing my opinions about what could be a great setup based on my experience. If you're curious, my network has 3 VLANs, isolated via firewall rules, with a WAN that is 200/10 via cable modem. The network hardware is an ER-X + 2 UAP-AC-PROs and a TP-Link 24 port PoE+ smart switch to distribute through the house. I'm really happy with my setup.

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

Thank you. 1st I have been advised in a separate thread to take this setup (Ubiquiti) in parallel to the one I have. Once comfortable - switch everything.

2nd: I have VoIP@Ooma wired, 1 Synology 3 bay NAS drive wired, 1 Brother N/w printer, 1 SmartThings (wired), 2 desktop PCs wired. Total wired: 6 wired. In order to facilitate this I had bought a long time back a simple unmanaged 8 port switch (Netgear). My Netgear router's WAN port is connected to modem and 1 LAN port is connected to this switch. All my wired devices are connected to the switch with the Netgear doing DHCP, routing, firewall, etc. 

3rd: After giving this much thought I think I'll go with USG instead of my home brew router. 

 

Question: I looked into USG and it offers extensive features coupled with having the Unifi controller s/w. From networking perspective it offers DHCP, routing, VLAN creations, etc., etc. So - is it required for me to get a switch? What if I retain the unmanaged switch and having everything setup via USG? What will my new smart switch or for that matter Edgerouter switch offer above and beyond?

 

I'll wait for others to chip in w.r.t. AP placement. The store had recommended putting the LR on top and PRO below.

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

Best thing to do is get a couple of long patch cables and temporarily mount them where you think you want to mount them, and then forget signal strength tests, heat maps and all that other crap and just walk around your space and USE your devices how you normally use them.

 

Note the performance of what you are doing.  If you are streaming Youtube videos, how's the playback?  Are they at the highest quality for your device?  If not, perhaps performance is being throttled by the wifi.  Move closer to the AP if your are far away.  How does it change?  If you get spotty peroformance, is it only in that one area or all over?  You can build a heat map or record signal strength too - but don't rely just on it.  I've seen people kill themselves to get a couple extra points of signal when their apps were already running great and those extra points didn't change the real world performance - but they made a bunch more work for themselves to get "ideal" numbers.

 

For the AC-LR sticky tape or that putty for hanging posters will probalby work for a temp mount, but the AC-Pro probably weighs too much.  If you have a long enough 2x4 just gently wedge the AP to the ceiling temporarily by pushing it to the ceiling from the floor.  It doesn't take much pressure so don't go nuts!  Or if you have a non-metallic ladder (wood or fiberglass), just lay it on the top face down.  If you want to get the AP higher/closer to the ceiling or have a metal ladder, use a cardboard box to get some more height.  If you are a klutz like me, tape the box to the ladder to make it more stable Man Happy

 

However you do it, the point is to test a couple of different locations and see how the coverage changes.  It doesn't have to take that long and it will tell you far more than any speculation here in the forums Man Happy

 

If it's easier to wall mount, try that too.  Who knows, while not the "best" from a theoretical standpoint, if it provides the coverage you need again who cares about theoretical "best"?

 

Good luck and happy testing!

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

I am actually using a 2 x 4 and works peachy. I'll use your advice and I have a portable setup with 4K video streaming - which I'm using to test.

Personally, till now results indicate I might even return the PRO.... The LR is giving enough juice even in basement. The catch is when MULTIPLE devices stream/kids play.

 

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

The choice between the USG and the EdgeRouter series can be a bit confusing in some cases, in particular for home uses where both can actually work really well. The USG has the benefit of nice integration with the Unifi product line and th controller, making it very easy to do your network admin from a single interface, but it is more expensive than the ER-X and ER-L. The ER series has a bit more functionality in terms of exposed features for advanced networking, but can be a bit more difficult to administer because of this (and it is not integrated into Unifi... there is a new integrated environment that is in beta, though). Crosstalk Solutions has a video covering the questions between the USG and ER series devices.

 

That said, going with the USG is a safe bet and you can still do lots of advanced things.

 

So you obviously have a bunch of other wired hardware, so yes, you're going to need a switch, if for no other reason than to physically allow the connection of all of your devices. As long as all of that wired hardware will run on a single subnet/LAN, any basic switch is fine. If you are planning to do VLANs, you will really want a smart switch. Unmanaged/dumb switches do not typically have predicable/defined behavior when working with VLANs since it is not what they are designed to handle. It is posible it will pass VLAN traffic, or maybe not (or possibly unreliably and/or inefficently). Assuming it does reliably pass VLAN traffic, keep in mind that there would be no ability on a dumb switch to configure port-based VLAN membership (i.e. PVID/VID assignments), port isolation, and other features that you might need if you have more than one LAN on that switch. For that, you want a smart/managed switch. If you're buying into the Unifi line, a Unifi Switch will make the configuration process even easier, but any smart switch should do the trick for VLANs.

 

Glad to hear that the LR seems to work well for range/performance through your house so far. One good reason to use both APs is to help distribute the traffic between multiple APs so that they run more efficiently, both in terms of traffic management and RF signal strength. But as @EricE said -- test things out in your real environment with all the traffic and usage patterns you expect to have in day-to-day usage.

 

I also agree with the idea of setting up the new network 'on the side' as not to interrupt your internet connection as a whole. Especially if you plan to experiment with various networking configuration options, this gives you a way to learn about stuff, mess it up, reset, and do it again without affecting everyone else. You can connect the USG (or whatever new router you get) to the LAN port of your current router to setup an online but separate network that will simulate most of the conditions you will later have when you complete the migration.

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?


@bmninada wrote:

 

Personally, till now results indicate I might even return the PRO.... The LR is giving enough juice even in basement. The catch is when MULTIPLE devices stream/kids play.

 


If anything, if you need two AP's because of all the streaming return the Pro and get a second LR Man Happy

 

I'm glad you just tried it for yourself.  That seems to be the hardest thing; getting people to just try stuff! 

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

I opened a 2nd. thread but will close it by tomorrow. I was scared as I heard many saying Unifi is tough, etc. I had it up and running in 15 min with my desktop currently running the Controller s/w. LR: 2nd. floor, PRO: 1st. floor.

I don't yet have USG or a switch. My old Netgear N300 router is running and into which all my critical devices are still connected.

 

I already determined more or less the best place to mount the 2 APs. Following are my current problems/questions:

 

1. I created FIRST 4 user groups: WORK_UG, STREAM_UG, GUEST_UG and KIDS_UG. Last 2 has down/up limits.

2. In default WLAN (renamed to WORK, I have created a SSID and associated user group: WORK_UG. Using similar model - created separate WLANs for Streaming, Guest and Kids.

3. In theory - as and when the wireless clients connect, based off the SSID I expose them to, they ought to get the correct user group?? Or, after the controller registers the wireless client - I need to use the controller software to associate the client to the user group? 

4. Taking just the LR AP into perspective, can someone help me understand Configuration: RADIOS. Should I keep HT20, channel = AUTO, Transmit Power = AUTO? What about RADIO 5g?

5. I have switched on BAND STEERING and AIRTIME FAIRNESS. Is it okay?

6. Is this the correct way - whereby I am restricting my guests to a subset of available bandwidth (see point 1 and 2 above) and furthermore in AP configuration - I have disabled Guest SSID for 5 GHz.

7. Is it okay to block LAN to WLAN Multicast and Broadcast Data in Settings?

8. I am not touching the section 802.11 RATE and BEACON CONTROLS as I have NO IDEA what it is, in settings.

9. Finally, in WLAN settings - what is this "Load Balancing" and "PMF"?

 

My deepest apologies - these might be rather dumb questions for you folks who know in and out of Unifi, for me its just 12 hrs. but looking GREAT, JUST FREAKING - GREAT!! 

 

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

Correction: I realized having 4 WLANs wont work. My LR AP can expose at a time 1 WLAN  in 2.4 and possibly another WLAN in 5 GHz. Not all 4. So, I consolidated all the SSIDs into 1 WLAN and removed the other WLAN. I have 4 SSIDs now within the WLAN. Reached max. I find this a bit strange. What's the use of the WLANs then? How do I isolate client connected to SSID = x from client connected to SSID = y if both clients in same WLAN?

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

Heh - glad you are still working things out.  It might take some time to get the terminology down, but keep asking questions if you still aren't sure you get it Man Happy

 

WLAN groups are a way to group SSIDs (or Wireless Networks in Unifi terminology) that an AP is responsible for. For your install, the default WLAN group should be more than you need since hopefully you won't try to set up more than 4 SSIDs.  You really want to limit the number of SSIDs (or Wireless Networks) you use because each SSID used introduces significant overhead and will clog up your airtime if you aren't careful. 

 

SSIDs are, by default isolated from each other.  If you want the guest/kids SSIDs isolated from everything else on your network, make them a guest network - that turns on client isolation not only within the SSID on Wifi but will keep users logged into that SSID from touching anything on the LAN too.  They will be able to see stuff on the LAN, but not touch it.  If you are using Unifi switches and a USG, enabling guest policies will automatically create a VLAN for the guest network, and with a VLAN anyone on the kids/guest network won't even see stuff on the LAN network.  If you don't have unifi switches or a USG but have switches and routers that can speak VLANs, you can configure the VLAN manually and assign the SSID to that VLAN.  It may or may not be that big a deal to create a VLAN depending on the user interface of your switch/router Man Happy

 

User groups are not associated with SSIDs, although you can set a default user group for each SSID.  If a user has a user group already assigned to them the default user group in the SSID is ignored.  For your normal SSID and the Streaming SSID, if you set the streaming SSID up mainly to use the user group feature - don't (because again, multiple SSIDs are evil/kill performance).  Just connect everything to the same SSID and instead assign user groups.  They are attached to - Users!  Click on the Clients view (Left, skinny black column in the controller GUI, should be the fifth or so icon down looks like two people).  Click on a client in that view that you want to assign to, say the Streaming user group, then click on the Configuration tab in the properties window for that user  and you should see where you can directly clients to a user group and apply the bandwidth policies. 

 

And you can bulk change users/clients if you enable the group config (upper right of the view under the gear icon) then check the users you want to bulk edit (checkboxes in the leftmost column of the users view) and finally once you have selected all the ones you want to edit, you have to click the Edit Selected button on the lowest left corner of the user view.  It may be off screen and you may have to scroll down to see it.

 

As for your other questions:

 

4. Taking just the LR AP into perspective, can someone help me understand Configuration: RADIOS. Should I keep HT20, channel = AUTO, Transmit Power = AUTO? What about RADIO 5g?

 

For 2GHz, leave the channel width to HT20 - not all devices work with HT40 and HT40 will overlap with other channels if you have more than one AP or neighbors.  Channel should never be left to Auto.  Scan your environment and for 2GHz pick only channels 1, 6 or 11 that are the least used in your environment.  Channels 2-5 step on 1 and 6, channels 7-10 step on both 6 and 11 so that's why they should be avoided and only 1, 6 or 11 used.

 

Transmit power: Auto=high and with 2GHz that's almost always a bad idea since 2GHz penetrates further than 5GHz, and on high 2GHz will probably always "look" better to most clients and they will cling to it; usually not what you want.  Start at medium and see where you need to go from there.

 

For 5GHz you can kick the channel width up to VHT40, but again you need to scan your environment and pick the best/least used 40MHz channel.  On 5GHz I tend to leave the power on high to start.

 

The AC APs have a scan feature in the AP properties.  It's labeled RF Environment in the 5.7 controller, I forget if it was labeled something else in earlier controllers - it will show you what's going on in the air around you and help with your channel selection. 

 

5. I have switched on BAND STEERING and AIRTIME FAIRNESS. Is it okay?

 

Some clients don't work well with one, the other or both of those.  I would leave them off unless you find you really need them.  Simplicity almost always wins over complexity Man Happy

 

6. Is this the correct way - whereby I am restricting my guests to a subset of available bandwidth (see point 1 and 2 above) and furthermore in AP configuration - I have disabled Guest SSID for 5 GHz.

 

If that's what you feel you want, sure.  Keeping additional SSIDs off of 5GHz if they aren't needed is definitely a good thing for performance Man Happy

 

7. Is it okay to block LAN to WLAN Multicast and Broadcast Data in Settings?

 

Some applications need it, but if you enable it and nothing breaks leave it enabled.  It keeps broadcasts from cluttering up your wifi airtime, again a good thing for performance Man Happy

 

8. I am not touching the section 802.11 RATE and BEACON CONTROLS as I have NO IDEA what it is, in settings.

 

Not touching things unless you know you need them is always a smart policy.  If you have iOS devices, you may wish to change the DITM to 3 on both bands - iOS devices prefer a DITM of 3.

 

9. Finally, in WLAN settings - what is this "Load Balancing" and "PMF"?

 

Load balancing tries to balance clients between APs.  Controller has to be running.  Shouldn't be necessary in a home environment. Not all clients like being "steered" and can react unpredictably so another reason to leave it off unless you really need it.  Usually if you place your APs properly and tweak the power of the radios clients will attach to the appropriate AP on their own.  Load balancing is good for when you have a handful of APs in large room full of people to try to keep the load distributed.  Unless you throw parties with hundreds of guests routinely and have four or more APs, ignore it.

 

PMF - did you click the link? Man Happy   As more clients get updated to support it, it could provide some more security at the cost of more overhead.   I'd ignore it for now. 

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Having wifi problems? Take a look here first: https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/articles/221029967-UniFi-Debugging-Intermittent-Connectivity-Issues-on-your-UAP
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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

THANK YOU SO MUCH!!

 

I used the RF thing and set both my 2.4 and 5 GHz to 20 as it seems that's the best and subsequently set 2.4 channel to 6 and kept 5 GHz channel to Auto.

In terms of transmission power - I kept 2.4 at low and 5 GHz at full blast. Will adjust based on time/usage.

 

I switched off beam steering, etc. and reduced my SSID count to 2 from 4. Yes : I guess its a common rookie mistake and you're correct - I did try to link WLANs to user groups. Now, using the client entries have corrected populated everything and along with it I get the benefit of band control. I already see an improvement whereby 3 of my kids are playing in the basement and there aren't any jitters, etc.

 

Also - just placed an order for USG, got it for $70 same store in NY. I also, as requested checked the AP I got: it's got the blue triangle and the store told me that's the new one. For now, my whole house is working relatively fine with 1 AP - the UAP-AC-LR. 

 

So - the issue I am now having is guest network. I put as "Open" and thus no security key. The check-box against "Apply guest policies..." is YES. In GUEST CONTROL, I have selected radio button "Simple Password" and enable guest portal - Yes. Template = Angular JS. A short title, enabled "Terms of Service" and everything else - as defaults. 

When I try to use my Guest SSID, my smart phone does go to the portal after successful login and then reports Error on page. In fact, even in web UI - the desktop Preview, etc. shows errors. Can you assist please?

 

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

The guest portal problem is resolved. After speaking to Unifi support its a known bug. The remedy is to downgrade to Java 8 144 build. Currently, as of 11/2017 the most-up-to-date build is Java 8 152. In addition, I also have Java SE and that too had to downgrade to 144 build. After which, the guest portal started appearing in guest devices AND its viewable in UI as a preview.

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Re: Got a good deal and now what?

[ Edited ]

Glad you figured it out and go support!  I don't use the portal so I wouldn't have been help.  

 

As with any new system, the biggest problem is learning the lingo - hopefully the way things plug together is starting to make sense.  Unifi is a pretty powerful system and it really does automate a lot of configuration stuff, even for home use.  

 

When you get your USG, the first thing you should do before trying to adopt it is upgrade the firmware from the CLI.  There have been a TON of changes, and in the latest stable firmware you can finally set the LAN IP address from the GUI built into the USG negating the need to CLI in and add an IP address in your current IP address range and delete the default IP address.  Finally. 

 

Technote for upgrading the USG firmware from CLI:  https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/articles/204910064-UniFi-Changing-the-Firmware-of-a-UniFi-Device#USG1

 

Once you get the firmware updated, you can log into the USG at it's default IP and then give it a LAN IP address on your LAN - then it will complete adoption.  If you don't do that adoption get's half done but never completes.  If you happen to be using 192.168.0.x or 192.168.1.x that it defaults to, then nevermind - you can adopt and upgrade it from inside the controller.  But if you aren't on the IP range in the quickstart guide upgrade the firmware first, then log into the local GUI (ubnt/ubnt username/password) and set the LAN address first.


Good luck!

 

EDIT:  The whole WAN traffic cluttering up the controlle stats thing has come up before, I created a feature request to hopefully address it here:  https://community.ubnt.com/t5/UniFi-Routing-Switching-Feature/Filter-or-exclude-ports-VLANs-Wireless...

When you receive a solution to your question/issue, don't forget to mark your thread as solved and to give kudo's to the people who have helped you out!

Having wifi problems? Take a look here first: https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/articles/221029967-UniFi-Debugging-Intermittent-Connectivity-Issues-on-your-UAP
Member
Posts: 177
Registered: ‎10-24-2017
Kudos: 92
Solutions: 9

Re: Got a good deal and now what?

 

All set!! I am waiting for the USG to come in but for now I selected 3 locations and using my iPhone and Airport Utility (GREAT TOOL, NEVER KNEW EXISTED!!) found the best spot after taking measurements across 7 possible locations for the AP. Also, I took the measurements EXACTLY in areas having MOST USAGE.

Few things are confusing me - Tx/Rx rates available in the PROPERTIES section for a client is what? It's the CLIENT's Tx/Rx rates or what the AP is generating FOR THAT CLIENT? I know what Tx/Rx mean - from client and AP perspective though.

Also - what's reasonably (industry standard norms - if any) of acceptable RSSI values? I am asking since I find clients all over the place, from -90 dB to approx. -30 dB. What I am trying to get at is tuning... I don't know much here but trying to find out what each client is and effectively I understood the weak clients bring down the entire n/w as they take too much airtime slice. Remember - I have the PRO unit which I am still debating where to put - 1st. floor or basement as the AC-LR is on 2nd. floor - already installed. On one hand: MOST traffic is on 1st. floor as that's where most streaming, surfing, guests, etc. but basement is where connectivity is weakest and I have 1 Apple TV there (streaming). The store - upon speaking to them obviously wanted to up sell a bit (I think). They recommended I return the PRO and get instead a HD paying on top the difference. Personally, I think HD will be an overkill. Currently, my RSSI values are approx. -70 dB: 1st. floor and -80 dB basement.

Did the answer helped you ? if yes, i would love your kudos on it
Established Member
Posts: 1,021
Registered: ‎09-24-2017
Kudos: 217
Solutions: 83

Re: Got a good deal and now what?

You almost certainly do not need the HD. HD is specifically for "High Density" user environments -- think airports, stadiums, schools, religious institutions... basically anywhere you have a lot of people using wifi at the same time.

 

Stick with the PRO or return it and get an LR, don't get the HD.

 

Meanwhile, how are you using the iOS Airport Utility to get RSSI info? I've known about the app, but never tried to use it for such measurements (at least not when using non-Apple wifi devices).

Member
Posts: 177
Registered: ‎10-24-2017
Kudos: 92
Solutions: 9

Re: Got a good deal and now what?

Download. Then iPhone Settings. Find the app and click it. Enable scanning. Quit. Now - open the App. You'll find Wifi Scanner option. Ignore the main screen where it attempts to find Airport device. Click the scanner link. You'll be asked - Continuous or time based. I choose 60 sec. Then start. Bingo.
Did the answer helped you ? if yes, i would love your kudos on it
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