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Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

This message also posted in "Airmax installation and troubleshooting" and "Airmax getting started"

 

I am helping a non-profit group who has built community services in a remote village in Nepal (Kumari): medical clinic, school, water supply, etc.  They need internet in the village and surrounding area to provide remote video for medical support (no permanent doctor in clinic), access to the internet in the school (streaming video, browsing, etc).  We have designed a network (see below) and need to configure all the radios before going over there to save time.  I have all the gear here.  We leave April 10th.  Soon!  While I thought I could figure out all the configuration details and am decently conversant in computers and networking, I am having a lot of difficulties.  I'm hoping there is someone in the Portland OR area who could volunteer some help.  Remote help might be my only option though so we could video-conference.   Send me your direct email and we can exchange contact info.

 

Thanks in advance for any assistance!  

 

Regards, 

Tom Lasseter

 

KumariNetwork4.jpg


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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

Your previous information was correct on being unable to use the same sector for distances and near.

 

that being said try to optimize the ptmp where you can. 2.4 ghz is a good choice for the close stuff since it will leave the airwaves available for the 5 ghz backhauls and interconnects to towers.

 

the rule of thumb we use for ptp and ptmp (with the sectors on one end), is nanobeams for under 1km, litebeams AC for under 4 kms and powerbeam 500 AC for under 12 kms then rocket dishes or air fiber dishes for the big stuff. 

 

Since your rural areas will have almost no interference in the 5ghz you maybe able to get further distances with the radios.

 

once you have all the distances product recommendations become a lot easier, however if you already bought all the gear. I am sure you will be able to make it work. 

 

I’ll pm you my contact info if you need more.

 

Regards,

Chris
www.edgarhighspeed.com

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Ubiquiti Employee
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

@elteejay  Welcome!

 

The list looks legit to me.  Do you have any vlans involved?  Or will it be a flat network?

 

How much traffic are you looking at pushing?  across the wireless bridges and out the WAN port?  

 

Thanks,

Jeff

 

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Ubiquiti Networks Enterprise Team
"I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only make them think." - Socrates

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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

@elteejay   - there is a wealth of knowledge in these forums and members are willing to help.

 

Can you detail what your having troubles with? You have a medium sized project here,  even for most experienced WISP's.

 

do you have anything setup and working?

 

 

Regards,

Chris
www.edgarhighspeed.com
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

I can individually configure radios without much trouble by attaching them to a PC.  Agreement from the KATM WISP is that we will setup the network on 192.168.11.X.  So i am setting static IPs for the radios.  

 

I'm having trouble with the ERX.  I can set it to 192.168.11.1 and connect it to my Comcast router which is DHCP 10.0.0.X.  If I connect a PC to etho1 on the ERX, I thought I should be able to log-in to the router at https://192.168.1.1, but that doesn't work.

 

Suggestions?

 

Tom

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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

Hi Jeff!

 
Thanks for the quick response!  
 
The ISP in Kathmandu (Sustainable Networks)  is charging $40/month per Mbps of dedicated service....no doubt they most expensive internet in the world!  Right now, we can afford a dedicated 10 Mbps: 40x10x12 = $4800 per year.  We hope to get support from the Nepali government and/or U.S. organizations to up that to 20 Mbps.  The ISP tells us they are paying $32/month for service from India.  China is bring in fiber, but the price hasn't gone down yet.
 
No VLANs involved.  No routers in the network other than the EdgeRouter in Kathmandu.
 
I'm trying to layout the whole network on the floor, configure radios, and test.  I have a Comcast router in the house and a number of computers I can use, but having trouble getting the EdgeRouter setup properly, the radio plugged in and tested.  
 
Thanks!
 
Tom
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

ok, I just want to break his down for a bit.

 

1. You are buying/getting an upstream link from KATM WISP. then your beaming it to a tower and then to your clinic, to start.

2. Are you sure that KATM has asked you to use 192.168.11.x for your internal network, or are they more involved than just the upstream ISP. The whole idea of having the ERX is to seperate/firewall your internal network and the upstream

 

3. How are you setting the 192.168.11.x and 10.0.0.X into the ERX. Can you post a screen shot of the config. If it was me I would start fresh and reset the ERX to factory, then use the wizard to setup DHCP on the ERX for WAN/ISP. This should allow you to log in on 192.168.1.1. Changing to 192.168.11.x would depend on the network layout from question 2

 

Regards,

Chris
www.edgarhighspeed.com
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

You mentioned you posted this in some other sections – please don't make the same topic in multiple areas because it duplicates community members effort. Thanks.
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

I deleted the other two posts on AirMax:Welcome and AirMax:Installation.  Thanks!

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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

Hi Chris:

 

In answer to your questions, I've added bold text.

 

1. You are buying/getting an upstream link from KATM WISP. then your beaming it to a tower and then to your clinic, to start.

Right.  One detail is that we are forking from the tower as we have LOS to one of the other villages (see previous map).  We will have a outdoor switch at the top of the tower.  Would like to use a 24V Ubiquiti switch, but can't find one so we are going with a Tycon switch.  Other suggestions/options?

 

2. Are you sure that KATM has asked you to use 192.168.11.x for your internal network, or are they more involved than just the upstream ISP. The whole idea of having the ERX is to seperate/firewall your internal network and the upstream

 

3. How are you setting the 192.168.11.x and 10.0.0.X into the ERX. Can you post a screen shot of the config. If it was me I would start fresh and reset the ERX to factory, then use the wizard to setup DHCP on the ERX for WAN/ISP. This should allow you to log in on 192.168.1.1. Changing to 192.168.11.x would depend on the network layout from question 2

 

Based on everyone's suggestion, I've started from scratch.  I want to plug the ERX router into my Concast router and the first radio into the ERX.  First, I plugged the router into my laptop and set the IP config as shown below:

 

ERXconfig.jpg

 

I then plugged the router eth0 into the comcast router and booted up.  The Comcast router sees this:

 

ComcastRouter.jpg

 

So the ubnt device is the router at IP address 10.0.0.172.  The first device is the router subnet: Reserved IP and no addresses viewable from the Comcast router.  

 

I plug my laptop (Windows10, Chrome) into eth1 of the router.  The laptop static IP is 192.168.1.2.  The wireless adapter is off, but I get internet via the ethernet connection, so the router seems to be working correctly.  However, I can't browse to 192.168.1.1 and see the ERX router EdgeOS GUI which is where I would like to tweak settings.  Why is that? 

 

Ultimately, I want to set up the ERX router network as 192.168.11.X so there is absolutely no router confusion with the WISP router at 192.168.1.1 during setup over there or subsequent maintenance.  

 

I just plugged a RocketPrism 5AC radio into the ERX router.  Browsing to 192.168.1.20 on my laptop fails.  However, on my Android UNMS app, I can see it and bring it up in Chrome on my phone.  So the laptop is not allowing me access for some reason.  Firewall problem, or something else maybe?  If I plug any Ubiquiti devices straight into the laptop via the ethernet cable I can get to them, but if they are connected to the ERX router along with the laptop, I can't.  What's wrong with my setup?  

 

FYI:  the web-site for the group I'm working with in Nepal is at:  http://www.healthanded4nepal.org/

There are photos and videos showing the village and people.  

 

Thanks for any and all help!

 

Regards,

 

Tom

 

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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

1. If you can't find the right switch from ubiquiti, try these, we only use them in our network . http://www.netonix.com

 

2. your config looks right, double check you lan adaptor on your pc that it has the right ip 192.168.1.2 subnet 255.255.255.0 and default gateway, 192.168.1.1

 

3. Can you ping the ERX from your laptop when plugged directly into it?

Regards,

Chris
www.edgarhighspeed.com
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

Hey Chris!

 

Thanks for all your help.  I have got the basic stuff going at this point.  Doesn't sound like much, but I've got the router and first radio hooked up to Comcast to simulate the Kathmandu setup with internet going on the network.  The next step is the Nagarjun tower setup with two RocketPrisms and a LightBeam hooked to an EP-R6 router set as a switch.  A couple of questions:

 

1. Any problem having 4 radios (without antennae) going in the room at the same time?  Interference or burnout? 

2. Is a switch a lot better than a router converted to a switch?

3. I want to limit the data going out on the LightBeam leg as the priority is the Kumari village clinic and school (see previous diagram).  How best to do that?

4. I was told PowerBeams have better antennae and I should use those on this leg to reduce potential interference with the RocketPrisms.  More expensive but worth it?

5. Any gotchas I should know of here?

6. Any obscure settings on these radios I should know more about and use?

7. Is UNMS useful in managing the network or is it still too beta?  Is there other software I should use?

8. Doesn't seem to be a way to print out the configuration parameters for all the devices.  Would be nice to have them in a notebook for the network maintenance guys.  Any easy way to save and print these parameters?

 

Thanks again!

 

Tom 

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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

1. Any problem having 4 radios (without antennae) going in the room at the same time?  Interference or burnout? 
I would limit the time you have these rocket prisms powered up without a dish. Litebeam is fine. I usually configure mine without a dish and burn them in for a couple hours. Of course you won’t get great throughput connections on the rocket prisms, but enough to test and probably a few hundred megs per second.

2. Is a switch a lot better than a router converted to a switch?yes, a switch has a hardware component designed for full speed switching however most routers have a software version of the switching component. Your ep-r6 should be fine for your load.


3. I want to limit the data going out on the LightBeam leg as the priority is the Kumari village clinic and school (see previous diagram).  How best to do that?
Easiest way is to put in a traffic shaping into the radio under the network settings, configuration mode advanced, then you should get traffic shaping at the bottom.

See image at bottom, this is setup for 17 Mbps up and download. I would put the traffic shaping onto the LAN port of the litebeam at the Kumari end, not the remote end. This way the radios can still communicate at full speed of the link but the traffic gets limited at a site where you can easily access the radio for changes. We all know there will be changes. 

 

 

4. I was told PowerBeams have better antennae and I should use those on this leg to reduce potential interference with the RocketPrisms.  More expensive but worth it?
If anything you would worry about self interference. lite beams have no shielding where the power beams and especially the power beam ISO’s are much better at shielding. However if you keep the litebeams and rocket prisms separated enough on the frequencies. You should be ok.

Can you confirm the length of the connections for the litebeams. In kilometres you may need to go to power beams for throughput.

5. Any gotchas I should know of here?
2 things,

1. when setting up the radios for initial alignment, always go for 10 MHz wide channel width and then once the dishes are aligned, (shoot for -50 dB)then move your channel width up.best way is to have 1 person on each end and sweep left to right (1 end at a time) the lock in best signal, the do the same for vertical.

2. Most likely your biggest challenge will be interference at your head end and theft. Not to mention serviceability of replacement parts.if you can get away with litebeams I would, simply due to cost and shipping vs the power beams.

 

 

6. Any obscure settings on these radios I should know more about and use? Did you buy international radios or us/ca versions. International radios should allow you to set the proper country code. Which then sets which frequencies are available in that country.I know you setting these up in the USA but you need to know what frequencies you can use in Nepal. Don’t want to get shutdown by the govt because you tramapled on their military frequency or something,


7. Is UNMS useful in managing the network or is it still too beta?  Is there other software I should use?
Are you running any servers or pc’s on site?
I would try and find a way to run air control 2 onsite, incase UNMS fails. I have found it is still very much beta. But might be your only option.UNMS uses web services for communication, air control 2 uses ssh ports, which won’t be available through your upstream ISP. since it appears they are already nat’ing your connection.


8. Doesn't seem to be a way to print out the configuration parameters for all the devices.  Would be nice to have them in a notebook for the network maintenance guys.  Any easy way to save and print these parameters?

From the system tab you can backup config to a file. I would simply print out a screen shot per tab.

06AF020A-F5E5-450B-9DE9-54F6D07F4B5A.jpeg

Regards,

Chris
www.edgarhighspeed.com
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

[ Edited ]

I was just looking a your map again and it appears in Kumari you are putting multiple PS and litebeams for each leg? maybe I am wrong but you might be better off using a rocket prism and air max 120 19 dB antenna or 2. Utilizing point to multipoint might make you install and future expansions easier. Might not help for the 100-300 foot links but... Thoughts?

 

leg 1————— rocket prism and 120degree 19 dB antenna at Kumari

leg 2 —————same device as above

leg 3 —————same device as above

 

 

vs 

 

leg 1 litebeam————— leg 1 litebeam at Kumari

leg 2 —————- leg 2 etc. 

 

 

Here if you need more help. 

Regards,

Chris
www.edgarhighspeed.com
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

Hey Chris!

 
So in Kumari we have two 90-degree antennae which cover the distance villages and schools on 5Ghz at max power as they are 2 to 10 km away.  In the village, the womens center is 50 m from the clinic where the incoming station is and the school is 400 m away.  Because of the disparity in distances, I was told you couldn't/shouldn't use the same sector antennae for both near and far.  For this reason, we are using 2.4 Ghz NanoBeams in the village. There isn't much 2.4 noise in the village (not too many microwave ovens and no phones) so hopefully this is the right design.  
 
open for suggestions!  
 
Regards, 
 
Tom
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

Chris!

 

Thanks for all the other detailed answers.  I'm trying to get an updated map of distances. 

 

tom

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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

Your previous information was correct on being unable to use the same sector for distances and near.

 

that being said try to optimize the ptmp where you can. 2.4 ghz is a good choice for the close stuff since it will leave the airwaves available for the 5 ghz backhauls and interconnects to towers.

 

the rule of thumb we use for ptp and ptmp (with the sectors on one end), is nanobeams for under 1km, litebeams AC for under 4 kms and powerbeam 500 AC for under 12 kms then rocket dishes or air fiber dishes for the big stuff. 

 

Since your rural areas will have almost no interference in the 5ghz you maybe able to get further distances with the radios.

 

once you have all the distances product recommendations become a lot easier, however if you already bought all the gear. I am sure you will be able to make it work. 

 

I’ll pm you my contact info if you need more.

 

Regards,

Chris
www.edgarhighspeed.com
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Registered: ‎04-22-2014
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Re: Help setting up internet in remote Nepal network

Hi Everyone,

 I just wanted to post a link to the pre-trip layout for this network that was designed and implemented by Tom (the OP) a hard working and eager to learn techy. Without this community’s help, this project would have struggled. I have been fortunate enough to work with Tom to get the backhauls and interconnects working and to help guide him on his technical journey.

 

It’s for a great cause and I’m looking forward to seeing the final installed version (via video) for the non-profit in Nepal. I know they will be doing yearly upgrade trips to Nepal, anyone know how we can bend the ear of Ubiquiti to maybe donate some gear??

 

@UBNT-SNK

 

Interconnecting schools, pharmacies and other health facilities in this remote area to provide a higher standard of care and education is only possible because of Ubiquiti and their products.

 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=niq2E6zvdVc&feature=youtu.be

 

Tom or I will post the final post installation video in a few weeks.

 

Cheers

 

Chris.

 

 

Regards,

Chris
www.edgarhighspeed.com
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