09/08/2016
The Amazing new AF11FX does 10X at 16 miles !!
Description

 

IMG_4995_v2.jpg

The new AF11FX next to its smaller sibling the AF5X


When I first started testing the new AF11FX, I mistakenly assumed it was a AF5X converted to 11ghz.
After all, that's what the other radio manufacturers had done.

 

But after using it for a few days, it suddenly dawned on me that I needed to re-think my pre-conceived assumptions.

My experience with the AF11FX was sort of like driving a new car that you assumed was a normal sports car and then one day when you need to pass someone, you discover it does zero to 60 in 1.5 seconds.   You say to yourself, hmmm interesting, so the next day you check how fast it goes and discover it does 240 mph all day long, and corners like an Indy car.  Then you discover the engine is built so well it easily revs to 12,000 rpm compared to 3,000 - 5,000 rpm of a normal car.

 

You end up blown away by the incredible performance from what you thought was a normal sports car.

 

Well my experience with the AF11FX, has been much the same.  The more I tested, the more blown away I was, and the more I realized that this was by leaps and bounds the best radio Ubiquiti has ever made.


My link was 16 miles (25km). Pretty far.  Because of the longer distance, I expected 6X.  First thing I noticed is that it caught 8X the instant it associated, even though the aim was still far off.  After a little aiming, it held very consistent full speed 8X.

 

I first used two 680mm (2-foot) Jirous dishes with about 35dBi of gain. I had signals around -60 which allowed super clean 8X.   But then I did some math and thought, what the heck, lets enable 10X on a narrower channel size where there's more signal margin and see what this baby might do.  With a narrow channel it instantly caught 10X at 16 miles, with 2-ft dishes! Wow!   

 

So that got me thinking. A little more math and I figured out with just 4 dB more dish gain I might just be able to get 10X at 16 miles on a regular full 40mhz channel.   It sounded like a long shot, but was worth a try. So I got in some 1200mm (4ft) dishes. I decided to first upgrade the dish on just the master side and see what happened.  I didn't even finish aiming and it was solid 10X!   On a 40mhz channel in both directions.......at 16 miles.

 

 

10XDE.jpg

The AF11FX doing 1-gig aggregate, 10X 1024 QAM full duplex throughput on a single 40mhz, licensed channel pair.

With one 1200mm dish and one 680mm dish, at 16 miles distance. 


I had mistakenly assumed that Ubiquiti would make very nice mid-range performing 11ghz radio, and disruptively price it.   Instead it became obvious that the AF11FX was engineered to take on the top of the line $13,000 radios. And leave the mid-range and the wifi based bottom feeding radios in the dust.


Its all about EVM and AirFiber's "secret sauce"
With other radios, there are limits to the distance at which they can achieve 8X (256 QAM). That's because of poor transmit Error Vector Magnitude (EVM).   In layman's terns, EVM is how cleanly, accurately and consistently a radio places dots in a decode constellation.


If you're sloppy in placing dots, you end up with a lot of misses and retries.   If you're already having problems getting the dots in the right places because of poor EVM, after you add a couple of miles of link distance, you quickly end up no longer achieving 8X.


To achieve the next big step up 10X, you need much, higher EVM's. A dead giveaway that a radio is based on cheap chipsets (such as wifi chipsets), is their inability to achieve 10X.

 

Because of much better EVM, AF11FX's margins to achieve 10X are actually greater than the other guys margin to achieve 8X.  Think about that. This radio does 10X better and more consistently, than other radios do 8X. It's that simple.

And its all in the better engineering. From what I understand there's a lot of fancy, proprietary "special sauce” the AirFiber engineering team has come up with in order to get this previously unachievable performance from the AF11FX.  Compared to the competition, all of this allows the AF11FX to have faster, longer links, with smaller dishes.


16 miles is by no means the limit for 10X. I hold the record for now, but I bet one of you can easily beat me with a longer link.  And the distance for 8X? My math says that even 2ft dishes will allow 8X at 50+ miles. And with larger dishes much, much further.


And of course remember that the 8X on the AirFiber line always packs a lot more bits than 8X on other radios, especially wifi based radios.

 

And in addition to the awesome performance, these radios are super low latency full duplex radios. At a price that's unheard of for high performance full duplex.
(I'll talk more about the features, why you want full duplex and additional photos showing the easy antenna connection in a follow up story)

 

Designing and building a new radio is like designing and building a new car. You design the best engine, best transmission, the best suspension, keep the weight down, etc.   You hope it all works, but until you send it out to different drivers on various race tracks, you're never really sure what you have.

 

Now that the AF11FX is beginning to be deployed, and these amazing results start coming in, I think everyone from the engineers who designed it to Ubiquiti management should be celebrating what they've accomplished.   This is truly an amazing radio, and we the user base should be giving them a standing ovation.

The Amazing new AF11FX does 10X at 16 miles !!

by ‎09-08-2016 04:02 PM - edited ‎09-13-2016 06:11 AM

 

IMG_4995_v2.jpg

The new AF11FX next to its smaller sibling the AF5X


When I first started testing the new AF11FX, I mistakenly assumed it was a AF5X converted to 11ghz.
After all, that's what the other radio manufacturers had done.

 

But after using it for a few days, it suddenly dawned on me that I needed to re-think my pre-conceived assumptions.

My experience with the AF11FX was sort of like driving a new car that you assumed was a normal sports car and then one day when you need to pass someone, you discover it does zero to 60 in 1.5 seconds.   You say to yourself, hmmm interesting, so the next day you check how fast it goes and discover it does 240 mph all day long, and corners like an Indy car.  Then you discover the engine is built so well it easily revs to 12,000 rpm compared to 3,000 - 5,000 rpm of a normal car.

 

You end up blown away by the incredible performance from what you thought was a normal sports car.

 

Well my experience with the AF11FX, has been much the same.  The more I tested, the more blown away I was, and the more I realized that this was by leaps and bounds the best radio Ubiquiti has ever made.


My link was 16 miles (25km). Pretty far.  Because of the longer distance, I expected 6X.  First thing I noticed is that it caught 8X the instant it associated, even though the aim was still far off.  After a little aiming, it held very consistent full speed 8X.

 

I first used two 680mm (2-foot) Jirous dishes with about 35dBi of gain. I had signals around -60 which allowed super clean 8X.   But then I did some math and thought, what the heck, lets enable 10X on a narrower channel size where there's more signal margin and see what this baby might do.  With a narrow channel it instantly caught 10X at 16 miles, with 2-ft dishes! Wow!   

 

So that got me thinking. A little more math and I figured out with just 4 dB more dish gain I might just be able to get 10X at 16 miles on a regular full 40mhz channel.   It sounded like a long shot, but was worth a try. So I got in some 1200mm (4ft) dishes. I decided to first upgrade the dish on just the master side and see what happened.  I didn't even finish aiming and it was solid 10X!   On a 40mhz channel in both directions.......at 16 miles.

 

 

10XDE.jpg

The AF11FX doing 1-gig aggregate, 10X 1024 QAM full duplex throughput on a single 40mhz, licensed channel pair.

With one 1200mm dish and one 680mm dish, at 16 miles distance. 


I had mistakenly assumed that Ubiquiti would make very nice mid-range performing 11ghz radio, and disruptively price it.   Instead it became obvious that the AF11FX was engineered to take on the top of the line $13,000 radios. And leave the mid-range and the wifi based bottom feeding radios in the dust.


Its all about EVM and AirFiber's "secret sauce"
With other radios, there are limits to the distance at which they can achieve 8X (256 QAM). That's because of poor transmit Error Vector Magnitude (EVM).   In layman's terns, EVM is how cleanly, accurately and consistently a radio places dots in a decode constellation.


If you're sloppy in placing dots, you end up with a lot of misses and retries.   If you're already having problems getting the dots in the right places because of poor EVM, after you add a couple of miles of link distance, you quickly end up no longer achieving 8X.


To achieve the next big step up 10X, you need much, higher EVM's. A dead giveaway that a radio is based on cheap chipsets (such as wifi chipsets), is their inability to achieve 10X.

 

Because of much better EVM, AF11FX's margins to achieve 10X are actually greater than the other guys margin to achieve 8X.  Think about that. This radio does 10X better and more consistently, than other radios do 8X. It's that simple.

And its all in the better engineering. From what I understand there's a lot of fancy, proprietary "special sauce” the AirFiber engineering team has come up with in order to get this previously unachievable performance from the AF11FX.  Compared to the competition, all of this allows the AF11FX to have faster, longer links, with smaller dishes.


16 miles is by no means the limit for 10X. I hold the record for now, but I bet one of you can easily beat me with a longer link.  And the distance for 8X? My math says that even 2ft dishes will allow 8X at 50+ miles. And with larger dishes much, much further.


And of course remember that the 8X on the AirFiber line always packs a lot more bits than 8X on other radios, especially wifi based radios.

 

And in addition to the awesome performance, these radios are super low latency full duplex radios. At a price that's unheard of for high performance full duplex.
(I'll talk more about the features, why you want full duplex and additional photos showing the easy antenna connection in a follow up story)

 

Designing and building a new radio is like designing and building a new car. You design the best engine, best transmission, the best suspension, keep the weight down, etc.   You hope it all works, but until you send it out to different drivers on various race tracks, you're never really sure what you have.

 

Now that the AF11FX is beginning to be deployed, and these amazing results start coming in, I think everyone from the engineers who designed it to Ubiquiti management should be celebrating what they've accomplished.   This is truly an amazing radio, and we the user base should be giving them a standing ovation.

ubiquiti certified trainer :: ubwa | uewa
Comments
by
on ‎09-08-2016 04:23 PM

fry

by
on ‎09-08-2016 04:34 PM

and that is why we needto be able to kudo comments in the stories section Cheers2

by
on ‎09-08-2016 05:17 PM

Awesome, now all we need is 11 ghz that does 80 mhz channels Man Happy

by
on ‎09-08-2016 05:24 PM

Good stuff. Love your posts!

by
on ‎09-08-2016 06:01 PM

Claude,

   I don't see the GPS functionality . Is there a reason for it?

 

by
‎09-08-2016 06:04 PM - edited ‎09-08-2016 06:22 PM

Exactly which Jirous antena do you used on link, i'm interested 680mm, but on site jirous.com i see antennas for powerbridge m10 or mimosa b10. Where do you see antenas 11GHz with N connectors.

by
‎09-08-2016 06:17 PM - edited ‎09-08-2016 06:17 PM

GPS is not needed for full duplex radios, so there isn't any.   The transmitter and receiver are on 100% of the time at the same time, so nothing to synchronize.

Jim

by
on ‎09-08-2016 06:26 PM

@oktawian Not sure they're on the Jirous web site yet.  Its just a standard Jirous dish with the 19mm waveguide.  Then there's a waveguide adapter plate where the RP-SMA to 19mm Jirous adapter mounts.  And the whole assembly seems to mount to any Jirous dish.  With a few small parts, any existing Jirous dish can be converted.  There will also be a lot of other easy ways to fit the AF11FX to various dishes. And of course a Ubiquiti Dish that will handle most link distances. 

by
‎09-08-2016 06:47 PM - edited ‎09-08-2016 06:53 PM

 do you have a 11 Ghz waterfall of the spectrum for this link. adjacent noise is somewhat quiet it appears, however you have 2X40 channels and not 1X80

by
on ‎09-08-2016 07:22 PM

by Packet_Doctor

do you have a 11 Ghz waterfall of the spectrum for this link. adjacent noise is somewhat quiet it appears, however you have 2X40 channels and not 1X80

 

In general, adjacent channel noise is not much of an issue with licensed links, because the process of coordination of the channels is done based on all the other existing links in the area.   There are certain levels of allowed distance separation for co-channel and adjacent channel (both first and second adjacent), and levels based on the antennas used (beamwidth) and the direction of the links, which is done to prevent co- or adjacent channel interference.   It's just part of the licensing process.   So there is very little or no signal to produce interference by design.   If you license multiple channels on the same path (which is how you get an "80 MHz" channel from 2 40MHz channels) or like the original AT&T long lines did (where they would get all the possible channels licensed on a single path and use much more advanced combining techniques to use all of them at once) then you control the interference level and it's your problem.

 

Plus, the AF11FX radio itself has very good filtering built in.   With this level of radio (vs ones based on WiFi chipsets) any actual signals there to interfere are (again by design) so far removed from the operating channel(s) that the built in filtering removes them as interference sources.   Plus the conducted power output of the AF11FX is much higher than the types of radios most people are used to  here (again the WiFi type) so the S/N ratio is much higher on these licensed links, again making any interference left less of an issue.

 

The short answer is interferrrence should never be an issue, and if it is then someone is violating your license and the FCC will be happy to fix that for you Biggrin5

Jim