2 weeks ago
airFiber 11x - Redundant
Reason for Installation
More Sleep and More Redundancy - Those Were the Goals. A Dual airFiber11 Ring was the Answer.
Used Products
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Location
Pennsylvania, USA
Description

Over the last year we have been working to add more redundancy to our network, tighten up longer 11GHz links, and replace some overly long 24GHz links or add 11GHz as a redundant option.

 

See my other post: https://community.ubnt.com/t5/airFiber-Stories/airFiber-11x-Blows-Mimosa-Away/cns-p/2099851

Regarding how two 11x radios is cheaper than one B11 and gives you redundancy.

 

In this case, we added another fiber POP to our network and wanted to add redundancy and traffic distirbution between towers.

 

We opted to again install two 11x radios, but take them to distributed towers. This allows us to build a ring between our core towers, and keep a 24GHz link of about 2 miles between them for backup, should an 11x fail.

 

We are feeding one of our primary fiber feeds to our two core towers via these 11x links.  Our other fiber feed comes in in another county and is direct fiber fed to one of these core towers.

 

roof.png

 

 

 

We have licensed the full 80MHz channels on both links, and are able to push around 750Megabits/second to both towers, plus another Gigabit in from our secondary fiber connection.   This screenshot was taken mid-day today when the connection was at a low point.

Screen Shot 2018-04-06 at 1.16.43 PM.png

 

 

We feed the fiber into an EdgeRouter, which then goes into a Netonix switch which allows us to control and power the 11x radios.  Oh, and remember that redundancy?   We also have started installing CyberPower Automatic Transfer Switches into our core sites.  These allow us to feed equipment with two redundant power feeds.  One to a UPS and one to either a secondary UPS or direct to utility power.rack.png

 

 

Here is some historical bandwidth usage for this link.  We are seeing it hit 400megabits/second at peak times.

Screen Shot 2018-04-06 at 1.21.49 PM.png

 

So far we are extremely satisfied with these radios and they are performing very very well.

 

airFiber 11x - Redundant

by 2 weeks ago - last edited 2 weeks ago

Over the last year we have been working to add more redundancy to our network, tighten up longer 11GHz links, and replace some overly long 24GHz links or add 11GHz as a redundant option.

 

See my other post: https://community.ubnt.com/t5/airFiber-Stories/airFiber-11x-Blows-Mimosa-Away/cns-p/2099851

Regarding how two 11x radios is cheaper than one B11 and gives you redundancy.

 

In this case, we added another fiber POP to our network and wanted to add redundancy and traffic distirbution between towers.

 

We opted to again install two 11x radios, but take them to distributed towers. This allows us to build a ring between our core towers, and keep a 24GHz link of about 2 miles between them for backup, should an 11x fail.

 

We are feeding one of our primary fiber feeds to our two core towers via these 11x links.  Our other fiber feed comes in in another county and is direct fiber fed to one of these core towers.

 

roof.png

 

 

 

We have licensed the full 80MHz channels on both links, and are able to push around 750Megabits/second to both towers, plus another Gigabit in from our secondary fiber connection.   This screenshot was taken mid-day today when the connection was at a low point.

Screen Shot 2018-04-06 at 1.16.43 PM.png

 

 

We feed the fiber into an EdgeRouter, which then goes into a Netonix switch which allows us to control and power the 11x radios.  Oh, and remember that redundancy?   We also have started installing CyberPower Automatic Transfer Switches into our core sites.  These allow us to feed equipment with two redundant power feeds.  One to a UPS and one to either a secondary UPS or direct to utility power.rack.png

 

 

Here is some historical bandwidth usage for this link.  We are seeing it hit 400megabits/second at peak times.

Screen Shot 2018-04-06 at 1.21.49 PM.png

 

So far we are extremely satisfied with these radios and they are performing very very well.

 

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Comments
by
2 weeks ago

Awesome story Matt!  Nice to see you got another 11FX up and running!

by
2 weeks ago

Thanks for submitting your story. Can you elaborate more about the redundancy method that you used? L3 or L2 and if you don't mind to explain how you acheived that?

 

Thanks!

by
2 weeks ago

$80 for a 20 meg connection. Jesus

by
2 weeks ago

@WisTech- Yup... going to be deploying many more.  For the price and the license it's stupid not to.

 

@issamfayad- We are using OSPF.   Without giving too much information about our network away in a public forum, we have a ring built into the network that closes at this fiber termination point and then a spur that goes off from one of our towers to another county where we also have a network.   The network is built in such a way that we can lose a tower or even a fire in a POP center and the network will keep running.

 

@athornfam2-I'm assuming you clicked on our website, since there's no pricing in this story.  That means you also then selected the most rural county we service to look at pricing.  A county where Frontier DSL is primarily the only option and they provide end users with 1/2 - 1megabits if things are working well.    Since this is a story about licensed microwaves, I also assume you know the cost to build 220ft self-supporting towers, 6GHz licensed microwave links, and network rings to get bandwidth into an extremely rural area like this with huge rolling mountains.   People in that county are happy to have a constant solid working 5-10 Megabits.   Those who really need it are delighted to have 20 Megabits for $80/month.  I personally paid close to $3,000 to run fiber optic lines so that I have Internet at my house because my Frontier DSL pulls .3 Megabits down when it's working.  There are Summer Camps and Retreat Centers that pay us for the $100/month plan because their business depends on solid connectivity and their clientele want it when they come.  People are fine paying us more because we come out the same day to fix an issue, rather than waiting 3-4 days for Frontier to show up and no resolution to the issues day after day.  Frontier techs refer people to us after they get fed up with going back over and over for the same service calls time and time again.

by
2 weeks ago

Very cool, I love reading these AirFiber backhaul / tower stories.  I like the AirCube on top of the ATS, is that your "rack wifi" ?

 

$80 for 20 meg seems reasonable in a rural area.  Where I am (Saskatchewan, Canada) rural internet is $80 for 5 meg and $100 for 10 meg, although those are Canadian dollars so it would be maybe $65 for 5 and $80 for 10.  It all depends on where you are.

by
2 weeks ago

@poisonsnakThe airCube and cnPilot APs are just test APs in the office.  We have them hooked up to LTE and a PowerBeam AC to test network performance.  Our office WiFi actually runs off a PowerBeam, that way we can see real world performance that customers are experiencing.  The servers and such are directly cabled in, and we can switch over if we would need to in an emergency.

by
2 weeks ago

@mhoppes I'm not saying you guys aren't doing a good job but why can't you guys offer higher provisioned speeds like other WISPs? It shouldn't be that hard to offer residents... more specifically business a solid 50/50 connection or higher.

by
2 weeks ago

@athornfam2  Every wisps markets are different.  Ans so are their typography and tree cover.   I doesn't make sense to comment about prices when you don't understand the deployment expenses involved and the market involved. 

by
2 weeks ago

@athornfam2 pricing is completely irrevelent to this story.

by
2 weeks ago

@athornfam2We absolutely could.  If you note on the website it says we offer faster packages at a custom quote.  We have business customers with DIA customers with symmetrical up and down.  We have business customers with 100+ up and down.   It's a calculated business decision.   Most end-user don't actually use more than about 20-30 megabits.   When we look at our overall usage the average person uses about 5 megabits average, even in areas where we compete with Comcast.

 

Sure, we could offer 50 and 100 megabit home plans, but why?  All it would do is potentially canibalize the AP timeslots.  If an AP can do around 130 megabits on a 20MHz channel, and I sell 50 meg plans and people actually use that the network will implode.  However, I can see a lot of 10 and 20 megabit plans and safely over subscribe.  If someone actually needs 50-100megabits they aren't a cost effective user for me -- at this time, unless it is business DIA.  We plan to start rolling out 60GHz and offering hundred megabit plans to residential/business customers in the near future though.

 

Also - on the network I was talking about in the very very rural county, there's only so much spectrum for backhaul.  In this case the backhaul microwaves are limited to 150Megabits using the 6GHz licensed radios.   So again, we have to be aware of bandwidth utilizations.   We have a 150Meg microwave network that feeds 3 rural counties currently and there is not a good way to upgrade it at the moment.  Plus there are usage fees involved in the microwave network.  As @ClaudeSS says, prices are created based on business model.

Although, even our 20 Megabits for $70 competes nicely with Comcast in the Urban markets.    Our wholesale bandwidth costs are dirt cheap, and I think we are finally getting to a point where we can start offering extremely cheap bandwidth in town to people -- potentially even undercutting Comcast... HOWEVER, that then brings up the issue:  How do you start offering cheap bandwidth without canabalizing your existing customer base who will call in to get the extremely cheap pricing and your revenue stream plummets.